my KETO journey – nightshades

I AM NOT A DOCTOR NOR A NUTRITIONIST.  WHAT I AM SHARING ON THIS POST IS SIMPLY MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE.

No, I am not writing a post about the window blinds we pull down in the evening for privacy and security.  Nightshades are vegetables and fruits which belong to family of Solanaceae plants of the Solanum genus.  There are more than 2000 species.  Ta-da!  Here are the most common.

POTATOES
TOMATOES
PEPPERS
EGGPLANTS
TOMATILLOS
GOJI BERRIES (WOLFBERRIES)
GARDEN HUCKLEBERRIES ( BUT NOT BLUEBERRIES)
GROUND CHERRIES
CAPE GOOSEBERRIES

If you have a nightshade allergy, your body thinks the proteins from the nightshade vegetable or fruit is a harmful substance and attempts to fight them off.  In contrast, with a nightshade sensitivity, you are unable to fully digest the nightshade vegetable or fruit , leading to digestive complications or other symptoms. nightshades

I did not want to see this, but I am willing to chase down any garden path to fight my arthritis pain without the use of pharmaceuticals.  According to one of my keto-genic advisors, DR. KEN BERRY, nightshades could be a culprit in joint pain and other inflammation problems.  My favorite side on my dinner plate for many years has been tomato slices.  When setting next to the mashed potatoes, I am close to heaven.  And then the diced peppers in my morning omelette – oh Lord, have I been that displeasing in your sight to warrant an allergy to tomatoes, potatoes and peppers?  Please say it isn’t true.

Yes, I will sacrifice the nightshades for 3 months to determine my lot.  Why couldn’t it be only eggplant? I hate eggplant.

GABBY COOKS – chicken & corn soup

I’m sure I could spend the rest of my life eating Grandma’s chicken and corn soup and be a completely satisfied man.  She always used dark meat chicken for more flavor, but it is equally delicious using chicken breast.  This main course soup is a budget stretcher which complements any shopping list.  Add some chopped escarole and you’ve created a health dynamo.  If escarole is not available at your grocery, curly endive, a cousin of escarole, will work just as well.

Escarole has no fat.  One and one-half cups of chopped escarole has only 15 calories, 1 gram of protein and 3 grams of carbohydrates.  It adds 5.2% to 8% of your recommended daily consumption of fiber which is a critical component of bowel health decreasing risk of constipation, diarrhea and diverticulitis.  We all know that adequate fiber will satisfy hunger with fewer calories, but to avoid bloating and gas work up slowly to an amount of 25 to 38 grams daily.

But wait, there’s more.  This one serving of 1 1/2 cups of escarole supplies 30% of your recommended daily intake of vitamin C and 4% of your DRV of iron and calcium.  A shortage of iron may cause you to feel tired, dizzy and headachy.  We all know the importance of calcium, don’t we?  Yeah, strong teeth and bones.  healthfully.com

here are the ingredients
  • 3 TBS olive oil
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 2 cloves chopped garlic
  • 4 chicken legs and thighs or 2 breasts ( or a combination of dark and white meat, it’s up to you whether to use the skin in cooking, I believe it adds additional flavor, but also calories and fat)
  • about 4 cups chopped escarole (Grandma never used greens other than fresh parsley and it was just as delicious)
  • 3 ears fresh corn, kernels removed from cob or 2 cups frozen corn
  • 1 quart chicken broth
  • 3 hard boiled eggs sliced
  • a sprig of fresh rosemary or 1 tsp dried rosemary
  • 3 TBS chopped fresh parsley
  • salt and pepper to taste
directions
  1. heat the olive oil in a stew pot or Dutch oven
  2. add the onions and garlic
  3. cook until translucent being careful not to scorch the garlic
  4. remove from the pot and reserve for later
  5. add the chicken legs, thighs, breast
  6. saute in the oil until lightly golden
  7. add enough broth to cover the chicken pieces and bring to boil
  8. immediately reduce the heat to a slow simmer, cover the pot
  9. cook on low heat about 30-45 minutes adding more broth if needed
  10. remove chicken from pot, set in bowl to cool
  11. add the greens, herbs, corn, and rest of the broth
  12. bring to a boil
  13. reduce heat to simmer and cover the pot
  14. cook about 15 minutes
  15. while that is cooking, skin and debone the chicken pieces
  16. tear meat into bite-sized pieces
  17. add the chicken and reserved onions and garlic to the soup
  18. add more broth or hot water if necessary to keep it soup
  19. season with salt and pepper
  20. ladle into bowls and top with the sliced hard-boiled eggs

Gabby’s garden

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I just got my winter garden planted last week.  Below is what it looked like about a month ago.  Summer heat and humidity along with a flooded yard took its toll.

But, our Florida weather turned beautifully fall within two days, I pulled weeds, spaded the 4 X 10 raised bed, pulled more weeds and raked the soil.  On October 25th the seeds were sown for my winter garden.

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I’m a Yankee gardener from many years ago.  My Grandpa raised over 5 acres of vegetables to huckster at nearby markets and he had several acres of orchards which included Northern Spy, Macintosh, Rambo, Delicious, Cortland and Rome Beauty apples plus numerous varieties of pears and plums.  Grandma had a quince tree in the yard from which she made a delicious jam.

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So, for me, gardening in Florida was a challenge because unlike up north in Pennsylvania, summertime in Florida is best spent sipping mint juleps by the pool rather than toiling in the vegetable patch.  Bugs, blights, birds, and awful humidity guarantee minimal returns on the gardening labor.

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On October 25th I planted kale, radishes, carrots, red beets, and spinach in the raised bed.  In the pots I planted sugar peas.  The radishes and kale poked through the ground within 4 days.  That’s what the above pictures show.  The spinach and red beets emerged today, just 6 days after planting.

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To all my relatives and friends up north enduring the first fingers of frost and chilly temperatures bracing for the wintertime snows and frozen gardens, HAPPY GARDENING from sunny Florida.