my KETO journey – the beginning

I AM NOT A DOCTOR NOR A NUTRITIONIST.  WHAT I AM SHARING ON THIS POST IS SIMPLY MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE.

Yes, it has been several months since last posting on this site.  Transitional doesn’t adequately define this time period.  Perhaps transcending, revealing, inspiring would be better descriptions.

In 2003 I experienced a ‘cardiac event’ which resulted in angioplasty and a stent put in place.  I truly regret allowing that to happen.  Since then, a succession of doctors has insisted on a statin regimen and an approved ‘heart healthy’ diet consisting of volumes of whole grains, fruits & vegetables, reduced proteins, and virtually no natural fats.  Encouraged were refined seed oil fats along with polyunsaturated fats.  The BAD BOYS became butter, whole dairy, and any saturated fats.  Also on the bad boy list was refined sugar (yeah, honey, and supposedly ‘natural’ sugars were fine).  The goal was to improve my lipid profile by reducing total cholesterol to less than 200 and also lowering my LDL and triglycerides while raising my HDL.  I was repeatedly warned that a heart attack or stroke would be my demise if I did not obey doctors’ orders.  The statins did work, but not without side effects.  I exercised to the point of exhaustion, I starved myself of the whole foods on which this farm boy was raised, and instead substituted the AMA, FDA approved heart-healthy nonsensical way of eating.  I also tried to lose the belly fat.  Finally I realized, “Hey, I feel like crap and I will not spend the last years of my life living this way.”

Enter keto-genic.  I watched a few YouTube videos by Dr. Ken Berry, read books by Dr. James Dinicolantonio and Dr. Joseph Mercola and I was off and running pursuing an alternative (but familiar from meals on the farm) dietary plan and lifestyle.  That happened on June 23, 2019.  The results have been nothing short of amazing.

Most difficult to transition were the sugary snacks and night-time, TV viewing, refrigerator foraging.  But as I followed my new lifestyle as closely as I could, the cravings did indeed disappear as the doctors said, and I left the dinner table satiated.  No longer a continually hungry man in search of a sugar fix, I was able to implement a 16-18 hour fast between supper and breakfast and I was completely satisfied with 2 meals a day incorporating the foods recommended by the doctors.  It was immensely more successful than the other diets I had tried – BLOOD TYPE, ATKINS, ZONE – and it was not a scenario of nail-biting, daunting deprivation.

I was advised that the initial weight loss would be about 8-10 pounds of water weight.  I assume that to be true.  And that was accomplished on a renewed effort with the ZONE diet prior to keto.  However, since beginning keto, I have lost an additional 12 pounds of belly fat and I feel great.

Two weeks ago I reviewed with my Medicare doctor the latest lab results.  He stormed into the treatment room and informed me that he was increasing my statin dosage to lower my LDL and total cholesterol and warned that if I did not comply I would probably die of a stroke or heart attack.  Truly, as predicted by the keto advocates, my total cholesterol and LDL had increased albeit not significantly.  After I allowed the doctor’s rant, I pointed out to him that my HDL had risen by 20%, my triglycerides had decreased by 40%, my glucose had dropped from 109 to 81, and I had dropped about 20 pounds of weight since the last visit.  After years of being termed pre-diabetic fighting off the doctors who wanted me on Metformin, I was no longer pre-diabetic.  He was momentarily speechless and we then began a meaningful dialog about my health care.

Assuming responsibility for my own health is not easy.  Rebuking doctors who are following 50 years of prescribed ‘heart-healthy’ diets is not easy.  But the proof is in the pudding.  After 50 years of listening to what the food and pharmaceutical industries are pumping into the heads of medical practitioners, Western culture is now in the midst of epidemics of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, dementia and numerous other conditions manifested by the unhealthy foods which we are encouraged to eat.

Not surprisingly, the food industries which promote packaged pseudo-foods loaded with sugar and non-food ingredients, the pharmaceutical industry which realizes billions of dollars in profits through sales of statins and Metformin, and the medical profession which caves to pressure from the insurance and drug companies have made preventive health care a jungle for those of us who refuse to accept the status quo.

Today, I feel healthier than ever and I feel liberated.  Now, excuse me while I go to prepare my fast-breaking meal of bacon, eggs, kale, broccoli and blueberries.

BON APPETIT

smiley face 2

GABBY COOKS – chicken & corn soup

I’m sure I could spend the rest of my life eating Grandma’s chicken and corn soup and be a completely satisfied man.  She always used dark meat chicken for more flavor, but it is equally delicious using chicken breast.  This main course soup is a budget stretcher which complements any shopping list.  Add some chopped escarole and you’ve created a health dynamo.  If escarole is not available at your grocery, curly endive, a cousin of escarole, will work just as well.

Escarole has no fat.  One and one-half cups of chopped escarole has only 15 calories, 1 gram of protein and 3 grams of carbohydrates.  It adds 5.2% to 8% of your recommended daily consumption of fiber which is a critical component of bowel health decreasing risk of constipation, diarrhea and diverticulitis.  We all know that adequate fiber will satisfy hunger with fewer calories, but to avoid bloating and gas work up slowly to an amount of 25 to 38 grams daily.

But wait, there’s more.  This one serving of 1 1/2 cups of escarole supplies 30% of your recommended daily intake of vitamin C and 4% of your DRV of iron and calcium.  A shortage of iron may cause you to feel tired, dizzy and headachy.  We all know the importance of calcium, don’t we?  Yeah, strong teeth and bones.  healthfully.com

here are the ingredients
  • 3 TBS olive oil
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 2 cloves chopped garlic
  • 4 chicken legs and thighs or 2 breasts ( or a combination of dark and white meat, it’s up to you whether to use the skin in cooking, I believe it adds additional flavor, but also calories and fat)
  • about 4 cups chopped escarole (Grandma never used greens other than fresh parsley and it was just as delicious)
  • 3 ears fresh corn, kernels removed from cob or 2 cups frozen corn
  • 1 quart chicken broth
  • 3 hard boiled eggs sliced
  • a sprig of fresh rosemary or 1 tsp dried rosemary
  • 3 TBS chopped fresh parsley
  • salt and pepper to taste
directions
  1. heat the olive oil in a stew pot or Dutch oven
  2. add the onions and garlic
  3. cook until translucent being careful not to scorch the garlic
  4. remove from the pot and reserve for later
  5. add the chicken legs, thighs, breast
  6. saute in the oil until lightly golden
  7. add enough broth to cover the chicken pieces and bring to boil
  8. immediately reduce the heat to a slow simmer, cover the pot
  9. cook on low heat about 30-45 minutes adding more broth if needed
  10. remove chicken from pot, set in bowl to cool
  11. add the greens, herbs, corn, and rest of the broth
  12. bring to a boil
  13. reduce heat to simmer and cover the pot
  14. cook about 15 minutes
  15. while that is cooking, skin and debone the chicken pieces
  16. tear meat into bite-sized pieces
  17. add the chicken and reserved onions and garlic to the soup
  18. add more broth or hot water if necessary to keep it soup
  19. season with salt and pepper
  20. ladle into bowls and top with the sliced hard-boiled eggs

GABBY COOKS – fresh beets

A dear friend of mine is an exercise freak.  When she’s not cooking a scrumptious omelet or mixing a Greek salad, she is jogging or working out at the gym.  I asked her, ” Why the strenuous activity and attention to a healthy diet?”

“When I die,” she responded, “I am being cremated.  I don’t want to be a grease fire.”

Okay, okay, you’ve heard it before.  I just couldn’t let that little snippet pass without sharing it with you guys.  But, it is a great bit of advice to heed.  Obesity is becoming a leading health concern in the United States.

I’ve been enjoying fresh red beets ever since my boyhood days on the farm.  The sweetness surpasses anything that comes in a can with a beet label.  When I bought a few at the market today, my friend said he loved beets but did not know how to cook them.  I’m sure most of you know what to do with beets, but for the few who don’t, this post is for you.

The beetroot is the taproot of the beet plant known in North America as the table beet, garden beet, red beet, or golden beet.  It is a cultivated variety of Beta vulgaris.  They are a powerhouse of beneficial nutrients including vitamins A, C, E, K, and the B vitamins thiamine, riboflavin, B6, B12, pantothenic acid and folate.  They are also high in calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorous, potassium, sodium, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium.  Additionally, beets contain important phytonutrients and dietary fiber.

Beets are not recognized as a super food as much as kale or blueberries, but these roots can hold their ground against the best of super foods.  Check the link

your wellness guide

for all the great health benefits available.  And if you are not yet convinced, BEETS ARE CONSIDERED AN APHRODISIAC.  Yeah, I can see those busy little fingers tapping on the keyboard now.  The high content of boron boosts sex hormone production and the nitrates increase blood flow to the organs.  Guys, y’all know what that means.  Hey, I’m just passing along information available on the great link I provided above.

There is a simple method to cooking those great roots.  I learned it from my grandma who pulled bushels of red beets from the garden and canned them.

ingredients

red beets

directions
  • If you are lucky enough to buy beets with the tops, cut the tops off about 1 ” above the root.  DO NOT CUT INTO THE ROOT.  The tops are delicious cooked or in salad.
  • Scrub, scrub, scrub the roots
  • Place in a pot large enough to cover them with cold water
  • Cook for about an hour.  It depends on the size of the beet
  • Refrain from piercing the roots until you think they have cooked long enough
  • Pierce one beet for tenderness
  • Remove from the heat and run cold water over them
  • When cool enough to handle slip the skins off.  You will be amazed how easy they skin
  • The top and the root ends will have a coarse texture.  Slice them off

Now you have fresh, cooked beets ready to prepare according to your favorite recipe.  Honestly, I keep a bowl full in the refrigerator and eat them like snack candy.  They are that sweet.

GABBY COOKS – porcupines & mushroom sauce

There are no quills in this dish about which to be concerned.  It’s just simple, down-home cooking that combines pork, rice, and mushrooms in a one pot, stove top meal.  For many years pork was the bad boy in the health-conscious diet.  Those ribs, chops, sausages, and bacon were attributed with ailments from cardio-vascular disease to bad skin.  Baby, times have changed.

We don’t eat pork 5 nights a week nor do we have BLTs  at every lunch.  But, in moderation, chops, ribs, cutlets, sausages are a wonderful alternative to beef and chicken.  Remember – pork is the other white meat.

Here are some pork facts:

  • pork is the culinary name for meat from the domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus)
  • it is the most commonly consumed meat worldwide
  • pig husbandry dates back to 5000 B.C.
  • pork is the most popular meat in Eastern and Southeastern Asia
  • Asia cuisines prize it for its fat content and texture
  • it is forbidden by Jewish, Muslim, and Rastafarian dietary law for religious reasons

A three and one-half ounce serving of lean pork contains the following nutritional value:

  • 13.92 grams fat
  • 27.32 grams protein
  • 36% DV of Vitamin B-6
  • 29% DV of Vitamin B-12
  • 35% DV phosphorous
  • 25% DV zinc

Add this meat to the wholesome goodness of mushrooms and rice – voila – heaven in a Dutch cooker.

here are the ingredients

 

 

  1. 1 cup cooked white rice
  2. 1 LB ground pork
  3. 2 cloves chopped garlic
  4. 1 egg
  5. 1 tsp dried basil or 1 TBS chopped fresh basil
  6. 1 tsp dried parsley or 1 TBS chopped fresh parsley
  7. salt and pepper
  8. 2 cups fresh sliced mushrooms
  9. 1 cup chicken broth
  10. 2 TBS flour
  11. 2 TBS butter
  12. 2 TBS oil, olive or canola

DIRECTIONS

  1. Cook the rice according to directions
  2. In a mixing bowl combine the pork, garlic, herbs, salt & pepper, egg and mix well
  3. Reserve a small portion of the herbs to add to the mushroom sauce
  4. Add the cooked rice which has cooled and mix well
  5. Shape in balls just like meatballs, place on plate and chill for an hour
  6. After an hour’s chill, heat the oil in a Dutch oven or heavy pot with a lid
  7. Brown the porcupines in the oil
  8. Remove them from the pot
  9. Add the butter to the pot and another TBS oil
  10. Add the mushrooms and stir to coat evenly with melted butter and oil
  11. After about 3 minutes sprinkle the flour over the mushrooms
  12. Cook the flour to a light brown, don’t burn it, stirring as it cooks
  13. Add the chicken broth and stir to mix with the mushrooms
  14. Stir constantly until the broth thickens into a creamy sauce
  15. Add the reserved pinch of basil and parsley
  16. Return the porcupines, cover and simmer about 1/2 hour

This dish is complete in itself, but sometimes I like to serve it in a bowl over hot noodles.